SUBJECT: Geography
TOPIC: Australia
GRADE LEVEL: Upper Elementary
CREATORS: Denise Charron, Sharon Morton-Cousi, Deborah Roberts, Vanessa Strickland, Terri Williams

AUSTRALIA

THE LAND DOWN UNDER*

Welcome to our unit on the 'Land Down Under'. We have compiled many lessons with fifth and sixth graders in mind. It is planned to last for eighteen days. In this unit, students will acquire much knowledge about Australia.

Our goal is to provide students with lessons and activities that will keep them motivated and enthusiastic about learning for the duration of the unit. Many objectives have been set for these lessons. In this unit, students will build new schema and reinforce prior knowledge about various aspects of Australia. Students will engage in several activities that are social studies based. There are language arts activities, science activities, physical activities, math, art, geography, and multicultural activities that require students to have basic fifth and sixth grade skills.

Students will need to be able to follow directions pertaining to each lesson to complete it successfully. Skills needed for students are measuring with rulers, measuring using cooking utensils, addition, subtraction, multiplication, fractions, reading graphs, basic writing ability, basic research skills, and coloring, pasting and painting.

Oh you bobby dazzler there is soooo much to learn about Australia and so you will if you take a peek-a-boo at this lesson. go ahead, give it a peek-a-boo!

*Notes from an Australian

Schedule of Events for Australia Unit

Day 1 KWL- We will begin our unit on Australia by using a KWL chart
Day 2 Globe activity- Today we will create a globe of Australia. This will help students become familiar with the location of Australia.
Day 3 Pen Pals- Students will become familiar with children in Australia. They will share information regarding their similarities and differences in their culture.
Day 4 Passports-Students will fill out an application for their passport.
Day 5 Post office trip-Students will go to the post office to learn the mailing process.
Day 6 United States and Australia comparison-Students will compare and contrast the differences and similarities of these two countries.
Day 7 Bark art-Students will make Aboriginal bark art.
Day 8 Geography-Students will become familiar with the major cities, physical characteristics and their location.
Day 9 Great Barrier Reef-Students will make a Styrofoam mural of the reef and hang for display.
Day 10 Climate Activity-Students will research the climate of the southern and northern region of Australia.
Day 11 Aussie phonics-Students will do Aussie phonics during their language arts lesson.
Day 12 Animals-Students will do an investigation of Australia's animals from down under.
Day 13 Diorama-Students will create a diorama of an Australian animal or object.
Day 14 Math-M.A.F. (Math and Australia are fun) Students will do their math lesson today with creativity.
Day 15 Map measuring-Students will learn how to use the scale distance key on the map as they imagine they are traveling.
Day 16 Mapping Australia-Students will label six states and two territories of Australia.
Day 17 Travel Brochure-Students will create travel brochures with facts about Australia.
Day 18 Cookie baking-Students will make Anzacs. These are a favorite cookie of Australian children. Australian songs will be sung during this activity.
Day 19 Field day-This culminating experience will involve outdoor sports activities. After these activities are over, Anzacs and outback punch will be served..

Michigan Social Studies Framework Strands and Benchmarks
STANDARDS
1.2 Students will understand narratives about major eras of American history and world history by identifying the people involved, describing the setting, and sequencing the events.
1.3 Students will reconstruct the past by comparing interpretations written by others from a variety of perspectives and creating narratives from evidence. 
1.4 Students will evaluate key decisions made at critical turning points in history by assessing their implications and long term consequences. 
2.1 Students will describe, compare, and explain the locations and characteristics of places, cultures, and settlements. 
2.2 Students will describe, compare, and explain the locations and characteristics of ecosystems, resources, human adaptation, environmental impact, and relationships among them. 
2.3 Students will describe, compare, and explain the locations and characteristics of economic activities, trade, political activities, migration, information flow, and the interrelationships among them.
2.4 Students will describe and compare the characteristics of ecosystems, states, regions, and patterns and explain the processes that created them. 
2.5 Students will describe and explain the causes, consequences, and geographic contend of major global issues and events. 
5.1 Students will acquire information from books, maps, newspapers, data sets, and other sources, organize and present the information in maps, graphs, charts, and time lines, interpret the meaning and significance of information, and use a variety of electronic technologies to assist in accessing and managing information. 
5.2 Students will conduct investigations by formulating a clear statement of a question, gathering and organizing information from a variety of sources, analyzing and interpreting information, formulating and testing hypothesis, reporting results both orally and in writing, and making use of appropriate technology. 
6.2 Students will compose coherent written essays that express a position on a public issue and justify the position with arguments. 
BENCHMARKS
1.2.1 Students will identify who was involved, what happened, and where it happened in stories about the past. 
1.2.6 Students will identify and explain how individuals in history demonstrated good character and personal virtue. 
1.3.1 Students will use a variety of records to construct a narrative about their personal or family histories. 
1.4.1 Students will recall situations in their lives that requried decisions and evaluate the decisions made in light of their consequences. 
1.4.4 Students will select decisions made to solve past problems and evaluate those decisions in terms of ethical considerations... 
2.1.1 Students will describe human characteristics of places and explain some basic causes for those characteristics. 
2.1.2 Students will describe the natural characteristics of places and explain some basic causes for those characteristics. 
2.1.5  Students will locate and describe the diverse places, cultures, and communities of the nation, and compare their characteristics. 
2.2.5 Students will describe the location, use and importance of different kinds of resources... 
2.2.6 Students will describe the major physical patterns, ecosystems, resources, and land...
2.2.7 Students will explain how various people and cultures have adapted to and modified the environment. 
2.3.3 Students will identify people, goods, and ideas in their local community which have come from other places, and describe why they moved. 
2.3.4 Students will describe major kinds of economic activity and explain the factors influencing their location. 
2.4.1  Students will identify regions in their immediate environment and describe its characteristics and boundaries.
2.4.2 Students will compare their communities and regions with others.
2.4.4 Students will draw sketch maps of the community, region, and nation. 
2.4.5  Students will describe places, cultures in the communities in the United States and compare them with other regions and countries. 
2.4.6 Students will describe the geography of Michigan at major times in its history and explain the reasons for its changes.
2.4.11  Students will locate and describe major cultural, economic, and environmental features of Africa, Asia, Australia, and North and South America and the processes that created them. 
5.1.1  Students will locate information using people, books, audio/video recordings, photos, simple maps, graphs and tables.
5.1.4  Students will locate information about local, state, and national communities using a variety of traditional sources, electronic technologies, and direct observations.
5.1.5 Students will organize social science information about local, state, and national communities from maps, graphs, and charts.
5.1.9  Students will interpret social science information about the natural environment and cultures of countries from a variety of primary and secondary sources.
5.2.2  Students will gather and analyze information in order to answer the questions posed. 
5.2.3 Students will construct an answer to the questions posed and support their answers with evidence.
5.2.6 Students will gather and analyze information using appropriate information technologies to answer the questions posed.
6.2.1  Students will engage each other in conversations about issues pertaining to governing their school. 






Lesson Plan Day 1: K-W-L On Australia

Objective

Students will learn to make predictions, to form questions, and to research answers when they use the K-W-L reading strategy to activate prior knowledge on a social studies topic. Students will incorporate the following senses: sight and hearing.
 
 






Rationale

Under the Michigan Standards for Social Studies, students will be using the following standards: 2.1, 5.1, 5.2.
 
 






Materials







Introduction

To introduce the unit, the teacher will begin by explaining to the class that today they will be learning about the country and continent of Australia by doing a K-W-L and by reading information from a book. The teacher will explain the a K-W-L is a reading strategy used for expository text. The teacher will explain further by stating the 'K' stands for what I know, the 'W' stands for what I wand to find out, and the 'L' stands for what I learned. The teacher will demonstrate on the overhead projector how the chart will have three columns and each column is labeled with one of the letters (K, W, L).
 
 







Procedure

  1. The teacher will explain that we will fill out the first two columns before we read and then do the last column after having read the book.
  2. The students will make three columns on their paper and label them K-W-L while the teacher makes a chart on the board or overhead.
  3. The teacher will then ask the class what they think they know about Australia and as students raise their hands to answer will write the responses on the projector without discrimination.
  4. Then the teacher will ask the class what they want to learn about Australia and will follow the same procedure above.
  5. The students will also copy the information from the projector onto their papers.
  6. Next, the students will work in pairs for cooperative reading, skimming through the book together to gather new information or confirm the predications they have already made.
  7. Once the reading is completed, the students and teacher will do the last column of the K-W-L. The teacher will ask the groups what they have learned from the reading and how does it compare to the predictions made in the two other columns. Did they find answers to what they wanted to learn? Were they correct in what they thought they knew?
  8. Using the questions above as a basis, the class will conduct a discussion on what they have been learning about Australia and then they can make suggestions as to what they would like to do in the classroom to learn even more.







Transition

Next, students will choose one fact of which they had no prior knowledge from the last column of the KWL chart they have created. They will do further research on that fact in order to write a short report that they can present to the class. They will make use of all reference materials available to them such as the media center, computer encyclopedias, and textbooks in the classroom.







Evaluation

The teacher will evaluate students during the classroom discussion to determine if students have accessed the correct information from the book in order to fill out the "What I Learned" column of the KWL.

Lesson Plan Day 2: World Globe

Objective

Students will compare and show the location of Australia on a globe and compare it to the rest of the world by completing a model of a globe for display and reference.
 
 

Rationale

It is necessary for social studies students to describe, compare, and explain locations of places, and the geographic context of world regions on a globe, also to create models and identify characteristics of shapes and patterns.

Using the Michigan standards for social studies, student swill be using the following strands:2.1, 2.3, and 2.4.







Materials







Procedure

  1. Students will color the maps.
  2. Students will cut the pattern of the map out.
  3. Students will glue the map onto the ball making a globe.
  4. Students will tie the string to the safety pin and place the pin into the top of the globe, then hang the globes from the ceiling around the room.







Wrap-Up

Globes will be hung from the ceiling like a mobile.







Transistion

The students will write to a Pen Pal in Australia







Evaluation

Students will be able to complete the globe in a well-constructed, neat manner.

Lesson Plan Day 3: Pen Pals

Before beginning this lesson, a lesson on proper letter writing skill should be completed.

Objectives

Fifth grade students will be able to increase their awareness of Australia by using their letter writing skills to inquire information from pen pals living in Australia. They will be able to share key facts about their country as well as our own.







Rationale

Under the Michigan standards, this lesson will involve Strand 5. It will also contain standards 5.1, 5.2, 2.1, 4.1, and 6.2.







Materials

Address
International Pen Friends
P.O. Box C65
Brooklyn, NY 11229







Introduction

In a large group discussion, have students brainstorm all the important information they know about their own country. Make a list of the group responses. Now ask what kinds of things would they like to know about Australia. Model a few ideas for them.

  1. What age do children in Australia begin school?
  2. What are they studying in fifth grade?
  3. What is their weather like?
Explain that through proper letter writing skills they will be able to gain information and knowledge about Australia.







Procedure

  1. Brainstorm all important facts and information abut our country.
  2. Make a list as the brainstorming continues so students can use if for reference.
  3. Instruct students to begin drafting a letter to an Australian pen pal requesting information about their country.
  4. Once the students finish the letter, they must either conference with the teacher or another classmate to check for errors.
  5. Write a model of what the return address should look like on the chalkboard.

  6.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    It is important that all students use the school address as the return address instead of their own. All return addresses should be the student's name followed by the school address. This is for safety reasons. Parents may not want their addresses given out for personal reasons.
     

  7. After all errors have been corrected, allow students to write a final letter.
  8. Mail the letters out as soon as possible and wait for responses.
  9. Once the letters start coming back to the students, the teacher should make a copy of each letter. Give the original to the student and keep the copy for all to learn from.







Transition

Make a bulletin board out of the letters that are returned to school. Display a large map of Australia in the middle of the board and when students receive responses, have them mark the city that their letter came from. This can be done by using sticky stars or push pins. Hang all the copies of the letters up so they surround the map. This can be a learning lesson for the entire school.
 
 

Evaluation

Through conferencing and reading the final product, the teacher will be able to evaluate the students' skills in proper letter writing as well as inquiry. Students will also be able to answer questions regarding Australia by reading the letters the others receive.






Lesson Plan Abstract Day 4: Passport Activity

Explain to students that when traveling to another country it is necessary to have a passport. Read them all the instructions that are required by applicants. Passports are government-issued documents that permit the holder to cross international borders. Most passports formally establish the holder's identity with a sealed photograph, indicate nationality, and request safe passage for the traveler. A passport may contain one or more visas which are endorsements permitting the holder to travel in a certain foreign country.
 
 

U.S. passports are issued to only U.S. citizens or nationals. Each person must obtain his or her own passport. Applicants under 13 years of age usually need not appear in person unless requested. A parent or guardian may execute the application on the child's behalf.

Each application must be accompanied by

  1. Proof of U.S. Citizenship
  2. Proof of identity
  3. Two photographs
  4. Fees
Brainstorm with the students what items could they use to prove the information listed above? Example would be birth certificate.

Make a copy of a passport application for each student. Have the students fill them out. When the students turn in the applications, make up passports and hand them out.

Suggestion: Have sample passports on display so students can see them.

Suggestion:Have a design a passport contest.






Lesson Plan Day 6: Australia and The United States Comparison

Objectives

Students will learn new information and reinforce prior knowledge when they compare facts about two similar countries. Once the data has been analyzed, students will be able to write a persuasive essay. Students will incorporate the following senses: sight and hearing.
 
 

Rationale

Under the Michigan Standards for Social Studies, students will be using the following standards:1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 6.3
 
 

Materials

Introduction

Explain to the students that the United States and Australia were both populated by native populations when they were colonized by Europeans. As a group, briefly skim over the chapters on colonization in the books listed above. Tell the class that now they will create a T-chart comparing the colonization process and the treatment of natives between the United States and Australia.
 

Procedure

  1. The teacher will crate a T-chart on the blackboard, labeling one side Australia and the other side United States.
  2. The students will create the same chart on their papers.
  3. As a group, the class will brainstorm ideas based on what they have read and the teacher will write them on the board.
  4. The students will copy the information from the board onto their papers.
  5. Some information that could be listed on both sides of the chart:
  6. After completing a list of similarities, the students will list a few differences between the two countries such as:
Transition

Making use of the same two books, students will read further to find out what these countries are now doing to restore what was taken from the natives, what steps are being taken to improve living conditions for the native populations, and what can be done to improve the relationship between the natives and the descendants of the European settlers. Then they will write a short persuasive essay about what they think might be some solutions to the problems and how to implement the solutions.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated as to whether they read and understood the classroom discussion when they contribute ideas for the T-chart. They will also be evaluated on their comprehension and writing skills as used on the essay.






Lesson Plan Day 7: Bark Art

Objectives

Students will learn to design and create a piece of artwork that tells a story when they recreate eucalyptus bark drawings. They will also learn how a culture that has no written language passes its history from generation to generation through drawings. Students will incorporate the following senses: sight and touch.
 
 

Rationale

Under the Michigan Standards for the Social studies, students will be using the following standards: 1.2, 1.3, and 2.1.
 

Materials


Introduction

The teacher will begin by reading the chapter about who the Aborigines are and the importance of their artwork from one of the books listed above. Tell them that the Aborigine are the native people of Australia and that even though they have no written language, they are able to pass their history from one generation to the next through their songs and artwork. Once form of art that they do is painting on the bark of the eucalyptus tree, which grows abundantly in Australia, and then they hang the paintings in their dwellings for decoration. The teacher will then explain to the class that they will be creating a piece of "bark art" that they can use to tell a story to the class.
 
 

Procedure

  1. First thing in the morning, students will be given a pre-cut piece of brown paper which they will soak with water.
  2. They will crinkle the wet paper into a tight ball, unroll it and set it out to dry.
  3. Each student will be given a piece of the dry, crinkled brown paper.
  4. Each student will be given red, black, yellow, and white tempera paints and a paintbrush.
  5. If they would like to, the students may sketch out their drawings in pencil first.
  6. The students will create their own Aboriginal artwork on the brown paper.
  7. The drawings should represent a story that the student is interested in sharing with the class.
  8. The drawings should be in the same style as and use the same techniques as authentic Aboriginal drawings.
  9. Once the paintings have dried, hang them up all around the classroom to decorate the classroom as the Aborigines decorate their homes.
  10. Students can stand by their paintings and tell a brief story to the class about their artwork.
Transition

Next, the students could take the idea on which they based their drawing and expand it into a longer, more detailed story. They would make use of the correct components of a story, such as plot, characters, setting. They would write the story using the writing process and handing in the published copy for a grade.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated as to whether they were able to recreate a piece of artwork that resembles the Aborigine art form and are able then to recite a coherent story based on the painting.






Lesson Plan Day 8: Australian Geography

Goal

Students will become aware of the physical characteristics of Australia and the major cities in the country. Standards 2.3, 2.3, 2.5, 5.1, 5.2, 6.2.
 

Objectives

Students will make a puzzle map of Australia. This hand-on activity will help students retain the information better and take ownership of their work. They will be able to locate australia on the map and cities within the country.
 

Materials

Opener

Activate students' prior knowledge by asking them what they know about Australia. Prompt students for answers then proceed to give them more information and show them a map on the overhead projector.
 

Procedure

Teacher

  1. After activating students' prior knowledge, divide students into six groups.
  2. Assign each group a region in Australia: Western Australia, Northern Territory, South Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria.
  3. Copy the map onto a transparency and show it on the overhead.
  4. Enlarge the map onto a master pattern sheet as a class rather than a group. This will ensure the pieces fit together once they are cut.
  5. Have each group cut their region out using differently colored poster board for each region.
  6. After all the groups have their regions cut, they will do research and add the cities within their region to their piece of the puzzle.
Students
  1. Students will respond to the teacher as he or she activates their prior knowledge about Australia.
  2. Students will work cooperatively in their assigned group.
  3. As students view the map on the overhead projector, they will become familiar with tthe physical characteristics and the location of the cities within their region.
  4. Students will cut their part of the region out, using a different color poster board for each region.
  5. Students will research their region and fill in the cities on their puzzle piece. The major cities are: Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide and Canberra.
  6. Students will make up questions and answers for cities within their region.


Closure

Each group will write up questions and answers for their region. The teacher will use these questions for a portion of a future test. Students will put their puzzle pieces together.
 

Transition

Students will hang the puzzle in the classroom. They will begin to do more puzzles on other countries, creating a geographical classroom environment.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on the accuracy of their completed puzzle piece and their responses to the questions being asked.






Lesson Plan Day 9: The Great Barrier Reef

Objective

For social studies students to learn about the Great Barrier Reef by creating a class mural.
 
 

Rationale

For social studies students to become familiar with the appearance and composition of the Reef. Using the strands under the Michigan Standards for Social Studies, students will be using the following: 2.4, 5.1, 5.2, and 5.3.
 
 

Introduction

The Great Barrier Reef is a chain of thousands of coral reefs and small islands located along the northeast coast of Australia. A coral reef is a limestone formation that lies under or just above the sea. The coral that forms the reef is made of polyps, the hardened skeletons of dead water animals. Living coral polyps are attached to the reef by the billions. There are about 400 species of these in many shapes and colors that include blue, green, purple, red, and yellow. Many sea animals also make the Great Barrier Reef their home.
 
 

Materials

Procedure
  1. As a class, research the appearance and composition of the Great Barrier Reef.
  2. Sketch a small-scale version of one sections of the reef for practice.
  3. Make a full-sized sketch on the butcher paper.
  4. Use the styrofoam packing materials and cardboard cutouts to glue onto the butcher paper to make a three-dimensional mural.
  5. Paint over the styrofoam and cutouts and paint in other details (other sea life).
Wrap-up

Individuals or small groups can write reports about the various features of the reef. Orally share the reports with the class. The mural and reports can be put on display.
 

Transition

Students will learn about the different climates in Australia.
 

Evaluation

Students will be able to complete the mural in a well constructed and neat manner while working cooperatively with each other.






Lesson Plan Day 10: Australia Climate

Goal

Students will be able to understand Australia's Southern hemispheric climate. (Standards 2.2 and 2.5)
 

Objective

Students will be divided into groups that represent the northern and southern regions of Australia. Each group will research their regional climate and be able to draw a bar graph that represents their findings. They will also be able to identify their region on a map.
 

Rationale

Since Australia is in the southern hemisphere, temperatures vary from region to region. The seasons there are in the reverse to the seasons in the northern hemisphere. This lesson will help students identify these differences.
 

Materials


Opener

Students will be asked what type of clothing they would wear if they were to visit their region of Australia during the months of January and July. Make sure they understand the climatic differences.
 

Procedure

Teacher

  1. Read students a story about the climate of Australia. Make sure they understand that since the United States and Australia are in two separate hemispheres, the climates are reversed. This will become concrete as they look at the map.
  2. Teacher will divide students into groups, Southern Australia and Northern Australia.
  3. Ask students to imagine a month in their part of the region between the months of January and July.
  4. Have students compare and contrast the differences of their region during the month of January and July.
  5. Pass out the climate activity sheet. Place a copy on the overhead projector. Have students look at the different perception and temperature reading and answer the questions on the activity sheet.
  6. Ask students to create a bar graph showing the temperature and perception of Australia for their group's assigned region.
Students
  1. While listening to the story, students will look at the map identifying the Southern hemisphere and the Northern hemisphere.
  2. Students will get into assigned regional groups and work cooperatively.
  3. Climatic regions will become concrete as groups research their region.
  4. Class will work on the activity sheet identifying the perception and temperature variation between January and July for their region.
  5. Students will draw a bar graph for their group's assigned region and each group will locate their region on the map.


Closure

Each group will share their region's climate and perception during the months of January and July.
 

Transition

Students will research other significant regional differences in Australia during January and July.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated by their response to the regional area their group was assigned.






Lesson Plan Day 11: Aussie Phonics

Objectives Rationale

This lesson is in accordance with Social Studies Strand of Inquiry Standards 5.1.
 

Materials


Opener

Brainstorm various lingo by having students use "hip" terms in complete sentences. Write hip terms on chalkboard and have class decode meaning of these words using the way the words are used in the sentence as a clue. Tell the students that often they can tell the meanings of words simply by reading the rest of the sentence and using the rest of the sentence as a clue. Tell students that when they do this they are using context clues.
 

Procedure

Teacher

  1. Teacher will conduct a brainstorming activity listing hip lingo they use today.
  2. Teacher will ask students to use these words in sentence and have class determine the meaning.
  3. Teacher will tell students the purpose of the lesson and distribute Aussie Phonics Worksheet.
  4. Teacher will assist students and lead students in a discussion about the worksheet when they have finished.
Students
  1. Students will actively participate in brainstorming activity.
  2. Students will give input when appropriate.
  3. Students will work individually or in a group to complete the worksheet.
  4. Students will participate in discussion and share their thoughts


Wrap-up and Transition

Teacher will summarize the lesson, reflect, allow students question and answer time, and make final comments. Teacher will tell students that they worked on Aussie Phonics and that tomorrow they will be conducting investigations about animals from Down Under.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on the basis of their class participation and on their worksheet results.






Lesson Plan Day 12: Investigating Animals from Down Under

Objectives

Students will conduct investigations on unusual animals from down under. Students will be able to work cooperatively in groups of twos or threes to answer various questions about these animals with 95-100% accuracy. Students will understand how to research topics and record information. Students will understand that there are many animals unique to the continent of Australia. Students will share investigations to be included in our classroom Book of Unusual Australian Animals.
 

Rationale

This lesson is in accordance with the Social Studies Strands of Inquiry Standards 5.1 and 5.2.
 

Materials


Opener

Students will take part in a brainstorming activity led by the teacher. Class will be brainstorming the most unusual animals they have heard of, its habitat, its family, what it eats, where it lives, a brief description, and an interesting fact about the animal. Teacher will also remind students how to use the encyclopedia. Teacher will then introduce the lesson.
 

Procedure

Teacher

  1. Activate students' prior knowledge about unusual animals through brainstorming activity.
  2. Divide class into groups. There will be two students per group.
  3. Teacher will introduce lesson and pass out activity cards.
  4. Teacher will give instructions, assist students in investigations.
  5. Teacher will allow students time to share there investigations.
  6. Teacher will collect finished products, laminate, and bind for display.
Students
  1. Students will actively participate in brainstorming activity.
  2. Students will assemble themselves into groups.
  3. Students will receive cards and await further instructions.
  4. Students will research their animal, record facts and draw pictures.
  5. Students will eagerly share their finished products.
  6. Students will take turns viewing book.


Wrap-up and Transition

Teacher will close the lesson by reemphasizing that there are many animals unique to the continent of Australia and the classroom book shows many of them. Teacher will tell students that today they worked on unusual animals of Australia and that tomorrow they will be working on Australian Dioramas.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on their group participation and finished products.






Lesson Plan Abstract Day 13: Diorama

Diorama

Have students select an Australian animal or object that they would like to create a diorama or model of . They must choose one that deals with Australia. If a student picks and animal then he/she must create a habitat along with a display of the animal. This project can be made in a show box or some other small box that the lid has been removed. The task is easy. Explain to students that they will be making a scene or picture that is three dimensional. Allow students to visit the library or look through class books until they decide what they want their diorama to represent. This is a good lesson to let the students take home and be creative. The ideas are unlimited.
 

Language Arts

Have students do research on the object that they create for their diorama. They could attach a 3x5 card to their display with important information about the subject they are creating.
 

Field Trip Suggestions

Take a class trip to the zoo or nature preserve. What animals do you see that live in both North America and Australia? Which, if any, are strictly Australian?

The pen pal lesson or the passport lesson would be a good time to visit the U.S. Post Office. Not only would students learn about the mailing process, they would also be taught how to properly fill out a passport application. This will give students the opportunity to ask any questions regarding the necessity of passports. Perhaps it will be possible for one of the postal workers to visit the class.






Lessoon Plan Day 14: M.A.F.

Objectives

Students will be able to use their basic math skills to solve math problems that have to do with various aspects of Australia. Students will be able to work with a partner to solve each problem with 90 - 100% accuracy. Students will be able to explain the method they used to solve the problems and exhibit calculator skills.
 

Rationale

This lesson is in accordance with Social Studies Strands of Geography Standards 2.1 and 2.4. This lesson is also in accordance with Social Studies Strands of Inquiry Standard 5.1.
 

Materials


Opener

Class will practice various methods of solving story problems by doing story problems similar to those on the activity cards that each group will receive. Teacher will practice using the calculator with students during the exercise.
 

Procedures

Teacher

  1. Teacher will present story problems to students and problem them for methods to solve.
  2. Teacher will allow students to use their calculators to solve problems.
  3. Teacher will ask for responses and check problems.
  4. Teacher will distribute activity cards, divide students into groups of twos.
  5. Teacher will allow each group 5 minutes to solve problems.
  6. Teacher will collect card and make sure that each group has had a chance to have each activity card once.
  7. Teacher will allow class to share their methods for solving the story problems.
Students
  1. Students will actively participate in this exercise.
  2. Students will use calculators to solve story problems.
  3. Students will respond and share answers.
  4. Students will assemble into groups and begin working on story problems.
  5. Students will actively participate.
  6. Students will finish all activity cards.
  7. Students will share their answers.


Wrap-up and Transition

Teacher will close the lesson by summarizing and reflecting on the lesson. Teacher will tell the students that today they worked on Australian story problems and that tomorrow they will be working on measuring Australia. Teacher will ask students if they have any questions or thoughts to share about today's lesson.
 

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on their group participation and their responses during response time.






Let's Measure

Objectives

Students studying maps will increase their awareness of size according to distance in miles so that when asked to measure the distance between two places on a map students will be able to correctly do so.
 

Rationale

Under the Michigan Standards, students will be using 5.1.6 and 5.2.5
 

Materials

  1. Pencil
  2. Map


Introduction

After each student has a copy in from of him or her, the teacher should begin modeling how to use the ruler that is located on the bottom of the map. Make it clear and easy to understand, explain that maps usually have a scale bar where the measured distance and the real ground distance are matched to each other. Explain to students that they will be able to measure distances on this map by using paper.
 

Procedure

  1. Do a sample measurement as a group first.
  2. Have students find Sydney and then Meekatharra on their maps.
  3. Instruct the students that in order to measure, they will put the edge of the paper along a line running between two points on the map.
  4. Next have students put a mark by each point.
  5. Put the paper on the scale bar and read off the real distance between the two points.
  6. Compare the measurements with class to see if everyone agrees.
  7. Give everyone the following list of distances to measure.
    1. Melbourne to Ballarat
    2. Port Lincoln to Arnhem Land
    3. Great Sandy Desert to Geraldton
    4. Fremantle to Albany
    5. Esperance to Broom
    6. Cape York Peninsula to Darwin
    7. Cairns to Port Hedland
    8. Perth to Gibson Desert
  8. Students who finish the lesson early can color the map.
  9. When the class has completed this assignment, have a discussion and compare answers.
  10. Allow students to take turn giving responses to the distances.


Transition

Now that students are becoming familiar with maps, it is a good time to begin a lesson to identify the major cities and capitals of Australia.
 
 

Evaluation

The teacher will be able to observe whether or not students are comfortable in locating and measuring distance between different areas in Australia. During the class discussion and response by students, the teacher will be able to assess the students' comprehension of this lesson.






Lesson Plan Day 17- Travel Brochure of Australia

Objectives

Students will reflect on Australia and prepare a travel brochure with interesting facts about the country.
 

Rationale

Using the strands under Michigan Standards for Social Studies, students will be using 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 4.5, 5.1, and 6.3.
 

Introduction

Students ware finishing their unit on Australia. They will be learning how to take key information about Australia and make it attractive enough to convince someone to want to travel there.
 

Materials


Procedure

Students will include the following information

  1. Name of country and capital.
  2. Mode of transportation, how will they get to this country and what will they sue for transportation when they get there?
  3. What is the common language spoken?
  4. What is the name of the currency used?
  5. What are some of the things that you can do, eat, or see in this country?
  6. Students will tell some interesting facts about the country (five facts, famous museums, landmarks, or people).
  7. Students will fold the brochure in three and attach all information to the inside of it.
  8. Students will place the brochure inside of the blue folder.
  9. Students will label the front of the folder and brochure with the name of the country and draw a picture of the country's flag beneath it.
  10. Students will discuss brochure in class.


Wrap-up

The brochures will be posted on the bulletin board for display.
 

Transition

This is the culminating activity on the unit about Australia.
 

Evaluation

Students will be able to follow all procedures and included all information stated above. Students will be able to discuss and answer questions in class.






Lesson Plan Day 18- Cooking Anzacs

Objectives

To have students follow directions and work cooperatively together so that when given a recipe they will be able to measure and mix the ingredients correctly to properly prepare cookies. Students will involve the senses of touch, taste, smell and sight while completing this project.
 

Rationale

While completing this lesson, students will be using Michigan standards 2.1 and 5.1.
 

Materials

  1. Recipe for Anzacs
  2. Oven
  3. Large bowl
  4. Measuring spoon
  5. Measuring cup
  6. Large spoon
  7. Cookie sheets
  8. Spatula
  9. Hot pads
  10. Ingredients


Introduction

Explain to the students that these cookies were named for the famous Australian and New Zealand soldiers who fought at Gallipoli in World War I. Today all soldiers of Australia and New Zealand are referred to as Anzacs. These are a favorite cookie of Australian children and can be easily made.
 

Procedure

Divide students into groups and allow them to prepare the recipe with little or no assistance. Explain to them how important it is to read and follow directions. The group is responsible for choosing one person to read the instructions, one to be in charge of the oven, and the remainder of the students should either measure, add or stir in the ingredients. Everyone must participate in this project.

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Mix butter and maple syrup until smooth and creamy.
  3. Stir in remaining ingredients.
  4. roll dough into small balls.
  5. Place the balls on a greased cookie sheet about 2 inches apart.
  6. Bake for 12-15 minutes.
  7. Allow cookies to partially cool before removing them from cookie sheet.
  8. Serve cookies along with a refreshing outback punch(apple juice)


Transition

While students are snacking, begin reading them a story. Choose a book listed in the bibliography at the end of this unit.
 

Evaluation

If the students work cooperatively and follow directions properly, their cookies will be delicious.






Day 19: An Outdoor Aussie Affair

Australia's moderate climate enables Australians to spend a great deal of their time outdoors. Australians are avid sports fans. In fact, approximately one-third of the Australian population registers to participate in organized sports. They also enjoy a wide range of other outdoor activities. As a culmination to our study of Australia, there will be an outdoor extravaganza. Students will be engaged in a lively game of kickball, they will take a brisk bushwalk (hike) around the school grounds, and do some kangaroo hopping. After these exciting outdoor activities are over, we will serve some aussie refreshments, outdoors of course. Anzacs are a favorite cookie of Australian children and these cookies can be made in advance with the help of the students. Outback punch (apple juice) will be our refreshing beverage.






Aussie Phonics

Read each sentence and write the meaning of the italicized word on the line provided.
  1. I got a 100% on my history test and my mom told me that I did a bonza job.

  2.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  3. Byron is my cobber, I tell him all my secrets.

  4.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  5. It is raining outside so I better take a brolly to keep the rain off me.

  6.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  7. My sister is very mean and she and I always end up in a blue.

  8.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  9. We will be going on our class picnic, we will need to take lots of tucker and drinks.

  10.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  11. Laren was Student of the Month for two months this year, she is quite a bobby dazzler.

  12.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  13. If you always tell the truth, you are a dinkum person.

  14.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


  15. They didn't want to walk to the thirteenth floor so they took the lift up stairs.

  16.  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


Return to Lesson Plan Day 11






Unusual Animals From Down Under

The following is a list of animals to choose from:
emu platypus koala
kookaburra bandicoot cockatoo
kangaroo wombat dingo
wallaby dugong cuscus

 
 
Draw a picture of animal
Investigation Data 
Animal- 
Description- 
Habitat- 
Diet- 
Interesting Fact- 

 

Return to Lesson Plan Day 12
 
 






M.A.F.
Math and Australia are Fun

SAMPLE QUESTIONS
  1. Heron Island sits in the Great Barrier Reef of Australia. The reef itself is 1,250 miles long. If your group were to travel the length of the reef at 35 miles per hour on a boat, how long will it take?
  2. Australia's Ayers Rock is two miles long and 1,100 feet high. What would two times half its height be?
  3. Sydney is Australia's Largest and oldest urban city having a populations of approximately 3,021,982 people. Which city's population would be closes to 2/4 of Sydney's population?
    1. Bendigo - 50,169
    2. Geelong - 122,080
    3. Brisbane- 50,169
    4. Toowoomba- 66,436
  4. A pretty-faced Wallaby female gives birth 5 weeks after mating. The young ones leave the pouch at 37 weeks and suck the nipple until 60 weeks old. How many days are in 37 weeks and 60 weeks combined?
  5. After Europeans settled in Australia in 1788, the Aborigines fell from about 300,000 to less than 50,000. What fraction represents the fall in Aborigines?
  6. The Darling River is the longest river in Australia. It flows southward 1702 miles until it meets the Murray River which is about 1600 miles long. How much longer is the Darling River?
Return to Lesson Plan Day 14






Bibliography

Juvenile Literature

Baker, Jeannie. Where The Forest Meets the Sea. New York. Greenwillow Books. 1987.

Browne, Rollo. An Aboriginal Family. Minneapolis. Lerner Publication Company. 1985

Browne, Rollow. A Family in Australia. Minneapolis. Lerner Publication Company. 1987

Cornelia, Elizabeth. Australia the Land and Its People. Holywell. London. 1977.

Fletcher, Kenneth. Civilizations of Asia. Chicago. Regensteiner Publishing Enterprises. 1979.

Fox, Mem. Possom Magic. Nashville. Abingdon Press. 1988.

Georges, D.V. Australia. Chicago. Regensteiner Publishing Enterprises. 1986.

Green, Carl and William Sanford. The Koala. Mankat. Crestwood House. 1987.

Lepthien. Emilie. Enchantment of the World-Australia. Chicago. Regensteiner Publishing Enterprises. 1982.

Lester, Alison. My Farm. New York. Houghton Mifflin Company. 1994.

Maddern, Eric. Rainbow Bird: An aboriginal Folktale Form Northern Australia. New York. Little, Brown and Company. 1993.

Morgan, Sally. The Flying Emu and Other Australian Stories. New York. Alfred Knopf, Inc. 1992.

Niland, Kilmeny. A Bellbird in a Flame Tree: The Twelve Days of Christmas. New York. Tambourine Books. 1989.

Oodgeroo. Dreamtime: Aboriginal Stories. New York. Lothrop, Lee, & Shepard. 1993.

Sanford, William and Carl Green. The Kangaroos. Mankato. Crestwood House. 1987.

Stanley-Baker, Penny. Australia: On the Other Side of the World. New York. Moonlight Publishing. 1988.

Vaughan, Marsha. Wombat Stew. Englewood Cliffs. Sliver Burdette Press. 1984.

Music

The Alawa Aborigines. Tribal Songs and Stories. Cassette tape. 1973.

The Wallabies. Music From Down Under. Cassette tape. 1987.

Adult Literature

Bergamini, David. The Land and Wildlife of Australia New York. Time, Inc. 1964.

Cousteau, Jean-Michel and Mose Richards. Cousteau's Australian Journey. New York. Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 1993.

Darling, Kathy. Kangaroos On Location. New York. Lothrup, Lee, &Shepard Books. 1992.

Darling, Kathy. Tasmanian Devil On Location. New York. Lothrup, Lee, &Shepard Books. 1992.

Education Research Council of America. Communities and Home & Abroad: The Aborigines of Central Australia. Boston. Allyn and Bacon. 1970.

Education Research Council of America. Communities and Home & Abroad: Australia and the Aborigines. Boston. Allyn and Bacon. 1974.

Epenshade, Edward. Goode's World Atlas. New York. Rand McNally. 1995.

Hudson, David. The People of the Ocean World. New York. William H. Sadlier, Inc. 1972.

Future Vision CD Rom. Infopedia The Ultimate Multimedia Reference Tool. Future Vision Multimedia, Inc. 1995.

Leonardi, Lisa. "Welcome to the Wonder Down Under: Australia." Mailbox Magazine. April. 1995. 4-10.

Nile, Richard. Australian Aborigines: Threatened Culture Series. New York. Steck-Vaughn Company. 1993.

Payne, Oliver. "Koalas Out On a Limb." national Geographic. April. 1995. 36-58.

Peterson, Larry. Fodor's Australia. New York. Fodor's Travel Publications. 1991.

Powzyk, Joyce. Tasmania: A Wildlife Journey. New York. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books. 1987.

Reynolds, Jan. Down Under: Vanishing Cultures Series. New York. Harcout Brace Jovanich. 1992.

Stodart, Eleanor. The Australian Echidna. New York. Houghton Mifflin Company. 1991.

Yanagi, Akinobu. Children of the World-Australia. Milwaukee. Gareth Stevens Publishing. 1988.

Videos

National Geographic Video. Australia: The Timeless Land. 1982.

Natinal Geographic Video. Australia's Unusual Animals. 1979.






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